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Sunset at the famous Oberbaumbrücke, crossing frozen Spree river (Berlin/ Germany)

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Ian Morris

Brexit was 10,000 years in the making, Stanford historian says in new book

News / July 13, 2022
What Britain’s geography means to the British people is key to understanding why they voted to leave the European Union, Stanford classics Professor Ian Morris asserts.
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Amelia O'Donohue

Amelia O'Donohue '22

News / June 12, 2022
Amelia O'Donohue is graduating this year with a degree in earth systems and a minor in global studies (with a specialization in European studies).
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Zac Stoor

Zac Stoor '22

News / June 12, 2022
Zac Stoor is graduating this year with a degree in political science and minors in global studies (with a specialization in European studies) and international relations.
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President Volodymyr Zelenskyy of Ukraine speaks at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies

‘Everything is Possible in Ukraine’: President Volodymyr Zelenskyy Addresses Stanford Community During Historic Visit

News / September 9, 2021
President Zelenskyy outlined the steps his administration is undertaking to bring increased digitization to Ukraine, curb corruption and create more equitable access to public services for more Ukrainians.
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Cityscapes around the world

Students zoom around the world as summer interns

Q&As / August 18, 2021
During the 2020-21 academic year, 49 Stanford students, including TEC's Zac Stoor, worked in virtual internships in 19 countries through the university’s Global Studies Internship Program.
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Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya discusses the future of democracy in Belarus with a roundtable of Stanford scholars.

Belarusian Leader Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya Meets with Stanford Scholars for Roundtable on Democracy in Belarus

News / August 4, 2021
Democratic leader Sviatlana Tsikhanouskaya and her delegation joined an interdisciplinary panel of Stanford scholars and members of the Belarusian community to discuss the future of democracy in Belarus.
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Flags of the United States and Russia

Stanford Experts Weigh In on What to Expect at the Biden-Putin Summit

News / June 14, 2021
Scholars at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies hope that President Joe Biden’s meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin will lay the groundwork for negotiations in the near future, particularly around nuclear weapons.
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David D. Laitin

David D. Laitin awarded 2021 Johan Skytte Prize

News / April 19, 2021
The Johan Skytte Prize in Political Science, known by many as the “Nobel Prize in Political Science,” is being awarded for the 27th consecutive year. This year’s recipient is David D. Laitin, for his “original and objective explanation of how politics shapes cultural strategies in heterogeneous societies.”
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Josh Cobler

Josh Cobler '20

News / January 12, 2021
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Jonathan Rodden

All Eyes on Georgia, an Election Battleground -- Again | Q&A with Jonathan Rodden

Q&As / January 4, 2021
By May Wong || It’s been a long election season, and it’s still not over. Two pivotal runoffs on Jan. 5 in Georgia will determine which party will control the U.S. Senate, as well as the fate of President-elect Joe Biden’s political agenda. Political scientist Jonathan Rodden discusses how Georgia’s electoral dynamics reflect trends in America’s political landscape.
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Anna Grzymala-Busse

Self-inflicted wounds: The Church and dissipation of Christianity in Europe

Commentary / August 11, 2020
Christianity in Europe is fading. A vague and symbolic identity is replacing belief in God, belonging to denominations, and attendance at religious services. Olivier Roy documents these changes in Is Europe Christian?, and shows how long-term secularism, recent populism, and the cultural shifts of the 1960s are responsible for this fall from grace.
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Hagia Sophia interior

Stanford professor sees Hagia Sophia as a “time tunnel” linking Ottomans to the Roman Empire

Commentary / August 7, 2020
Stanford history professor says conquest narratives don’t fully explain Hagia Sophia’s lasting legacy.
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Stalin and the Fate of Europe book

Norman Naimark Awarded the 2020 Norris and Carol Hundley Award

News / July 31, 2020
Norman Naimark received the 2020 Norris and Carol Hundley Award from the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association
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Ran Abramitzky

Ran Abramitzky Appointed H&S Senior Associate Dean of Social Sciences

News / July 28, 2020
Professor of economics Ran Abramitzky has been named the new senior associate dean of the social sciences in the School of Humanities and Sciences. He will begin his term on September 1, 2020.
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Arvind Krishnamurthy

Arvind Krishnamurthy: PhD Faculty Distinguished Service Award

News / July 24, 2020
PhD students awarded Arvind Krishnamurthy, the John S. Osterweis Professor of Finance, the PhD Faculty Distinguished Service Award during a virtual ceremony.
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salvini populism italy

The Spread of Populism Around the World is a Threat to Democracy According to New Stanford Report

News / June 2, 2020
Global populism is on the rise, and four FSI scholars are working to understand why populist parties and leaders have seen increased support in recent years.
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Philosophy Talk still shot

Joshua Landy on the radio show "Philosophy Talk," celebrating its 500th episode

Q&As / May 21, 2020
As Philosophy Talk reaches 500th episode, the well-loved radio show discusses how humanities can help during the pandemic
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Encina Hall and its front lawn

COVID-19 and Implications for Europe

Commentary / May 18, 2020
The Europe Center at Stanford's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) presents "How Different is Europe?" exploring how the coronavirus pandemic has affected Europe. Why have some countries been hit so hard, while others seemingly escape? How do we make sense of the very different government responses?
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Paula Findlen, Ubaldo Pierotti Professor of Italian History

For Renaissance Italians, combating black plague was as much about politics as it was science, according to Stanford scholar

Q&As / May 12, 2020
The inability of 14th-century medicine to stop the plague from destroying societies throughout Europe and Asia helped advance scientific discovery and transformed politics and health policy, says Stanford historian Paula Findlen.
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Anna Grzymala-Busse named CASBS 2020-2021 Fellow

News / March 24, 2020

Five Stanford scholars will be among 38 fellows in residence at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences (CASBS) during the 2020-21 academic year.

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