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Rose Gottemoeller, Steven Pifer, Francis Fukuyama, and Michael McFaul discuss the complex life and legacy of the last leader of the Soviet Union.

What Britain’s geography means to the British people is key to understanding why they voted to leave the European Union, Stanford classics Professor Ian Morris asserts.

News

Amelia O'Donohue is graduating this year with a degree in earth systems and a minor in global studies (with a specialization in European studies).

News

Zac Stoor is graduating this year with a degree in political science and minors in global studies (with a specialization in European studies) and international relations.

During the 2020-21 academic year, 49 Stanford students, including TEC's Zac Stoor, worked in virtual internships in 19 countries through the university’s Global Studies Internship Program.

Scholars at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies hope that President Joe Biden’s meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin will lay the groundwork for negotiations in the near future, particularly around nuclear weapons.

The Johan Skytte Prize in Political Science, known by many as the “Nobel Prize in Political Science,” is being awarded for the 27th consecutive year. This year’s recipient is David D. Laitin, for his “original and objective explanation of how politics shapes cultural strategies in heterogeneous societies.”

By May Wong || It’s been a long election season, and it’s still not over. Two pivotal runoffs on Jan. 5 in Georgia will determine which party will control the U.S. Senate, as well as the fate of President-elect Joe Biden’s political agenda. Political scientist Jonathan Rodden discusses how Georgia’s electoral dynamics reflect trends in America’s political landscape.

Christianity in Europe is fading. A vague and symbolic identity is replacing belief in God, belonging to denominations, and attendance at religious services. Olivier Roy documents these changes in Is Europe Christian?, and shows how long-term secularism, recent populism, and the cultural shifts of the 1960s are responsible for this fall from grace.

Norman Naimark received the 2020 Norris and Carol Hundley Award from the Pacific Coast Branch of the American Historical Association

Professor of economics Ran Abramitzky has been named the new senior associate dean of the social sciences in the School of Humanities and Sciences. He will begin his term on September 1, 2020.

PhD students awarded Arvind Krishnamurthy, the John S. Osterweis Professor of Finance, the PhD Faculty Distinguished Service Award during a virtual ceremony.

Global populism is on the rise, and four FSI scholars are working to understand why populist parties and leaders have seen increased support in recent years.

The Europe Center at Stanford's Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI) presents "How Different is Europe?" exploring how the coronavirus pandemic has affected Europe. Why have some countries been hit so hard, while others seemingly escape? How do we make sense of the very different government responses?

The inability of 14th-century medicine to stop the plague from destroying societies throughout Europe and Asia helped advance scientific discovery and transformed politics and health policy, says Stanford historian Paula Findlen.

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