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Krish Seetah
Journal Articles

Colonialism, slavery and ‘The Great Experiment’: Carbon, nitrogen and oxygen isotope analysis of Le Morne and Bois Marchand cemeteries, Mauritius

Emm Lightfoot, Saša Čaval, Diego Calaon, Jo Appleby, Jonathan Santana, Alessandra Cianciosi, Rosa Fregel, Krish Seetah
Journal of Archaeological Science, 2020 June 30, 2020

Slavery, colonialism and emancipation are important aspects of archaeological research in the Atlantic region, but the lifeways of colonial populations remain understudied in the Indian Ocean World. Here, we help to redress this imbalance by undertaking stable isotope analysis (C, N and O) on human remains from Mauritius, a location which played an important role in the movement of people across the Indian Ocean and beyond.

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Journal Articles

Archaeology and contemporary emerging zoonosis: A framework for predicting future Rift Valley fever virus outbreaks

Krish Seetah, Desiree LaBeaud, Jochen Kumm, Elysse Grossi‐Soyster, Alfred Anangwe, Michele Barry
International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, 2020 January 29, 2020

Modelling of emerging vector borne diseases serves as an important complement to clinical studies of modern zoonoses. This article presents an archaeo‐historic epidemiological modelling study of Rift Valley fever (RVF), using data‐driven neural network technology. RVF affects both human and animal populations, can rapidly decimate herds causing catastrophic economic hardship, and is identified as a Category A biodefense pathogen by the US Center for Disease Control.

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Journal Articles

The Baltic Crusades and ecological transformation: The zooarchaeology of conquest and cultural change in the Eastern Baltic in the second millennium AD

Krish Seetah, et. al
Quaternary International, 2019 March 20, 2019

From the end of the 12th century, crusading armies unleashed a relentless holy war against the indigenous pagan societies in the Eastern Baltic region. Native territories were reorganised as new Christian states (Livonia and Prussia) largely run by a militarised theocracy, dominated by the Teutonic Order. The new regime constructed castles, encouraged colonists, developed towns and introduced Christianity, incorporating the conquered territories into Latin Europe.

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Books

Humans, Animals, and the Craft of Slaughter in Archaeo-Historic Societies

Krish Seetah
Cambridge University Press, 2018 December 1, 2018

In this book, Krish Seetah uses butchery as a point of departure for exploring the changing historical relationships between animal utility, symbolism, and meat consumption. Seetah brings together several bodies of literature - on meat, cut marks, craftspeople, and the role of craft in production - that have heretofore been considered in isolation from one another. Focusing on the activity inherent in butcher, he describes the history of knowledge that typifies the craft.

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Journal Articles

Colonial iron in context: the Trianon slave shackle from Mauritius

Krish Seetah, Thomas Birch, Diego Calaon, Saša Čaval
Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences, 2017 April 1, 2017
In 2009, part of a ‘slave shackle’ was recovered from archaeological investigations at Trianon, an indentured labourer site on Mauritius dated from the beginning of the nineteenth century. This paper presents the results of a metallurgical assessment of the artefact, thought to represent colonial ironwork, a category that has hitherto remained understudied. The results are incorporated into the wider archaeological and historical evidence from Trianon, highlighting the value of studying colonial ironwork in context.
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Journal Articles

A ‘long-fuse domestication’ of the horse? Tooth shape suggests explosive change in modern breeds compared with extinct populations and living Przewalski’s horses

Krish Seetah, Andrea Cardini, Graeme Barker
The Holocene, 2016 January 30, 2016
Archaeological and molecular data suggest that horses were domesticated comparatively recently, the genetic evidence indicating that this was from several maternal haplotypes but only a single paternal one. However, although central to our understanding of how humans and environmental conditions shaped animals during domestication, the phenotypic changes associated with this idiosyncratic domestication process remain unclear.
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