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Priya Satia
Books

Time’s Monster: How History Makes History

Priya Satia
Harvard University Press, 2020 October 20, 2020

For generations, British thinkers told the history of an empire whose story was still very much in the making. While they wrote of conquest, imperial rule in India, the Middle East, Africa, and the Caribbean was consolidated. While they described the development of imperial governance, rebellions were brutally crushed. As they reimagined empire during the two world wars, decolonization was compromised. Priya Satia shows how these historians not only interpreted the major political events of their time but also shaped the future that followed.

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Books

Empire of Guns: The Violent Making of the Industrial Revolution

Priya Satia
Penguin Press, 2018 April 10, 2018

We have long understood the Industrial Revolution as a triumphant story of innovation and technology. Empire of Guns, a rich and ambitious new book by award-winning historian Priya Satia, upends this conventional wisdom by placing war and Britain's prosperous gun trade at the heart of the Industrial Revolution and the state's imperial expansion.

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Commentary

Global roots of India’s freedom struggle

Priya Satia
The Tribune, 2017 August 22, 2017

The Ghadar movement cultivated strong ties of solidarity with Egyptian, Irish, and other anti-colonial movements. Competing visions of the future world order coexisted with common dissatisfaction with the contemporary world order. Ghadar linked militant diaspora intellectuals with activists in the subcontinent.

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Journal Articles

Centrality of margins: The British campaigns in the Middle East during the Great War

Priya Satia
Annals. History, Social Sciences, 2016 December 31, 2016

The name "world war" was given to the war of 1914-1918 because of its kaleidoscopic character: its fronts extended from the East to the West, on several seas and several continents. Yet the memory and cultural experience of this conflict are closely linked to the western front, which, it is true, is a particularly tragic terrain for examining the paradoxes and horrors of modernity that this war may have represented .

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Journal Articles

Byron, Gandhi and the Thompsons: the Making of British Social History and Unmaking of Indian History

Priya Satia
History Workshop Journal, 2016 April 1, 2016

This paper explores the influence of the Indian nationalist movement on the formation of British social history by highlighting the intellectual and social bonds between key nationalists and the Thompson family (Edward Thompson and his sons Frank and E. P. Thompson). A twentieth-century preoccupation with Byron, whose Romantic views of freedom and nation were shaped by the period of colonial conquest, hangs over the joint intellectual and political history of Indian nationalism and British socialism. Besides the Thompsons, Mohandas Gandhi, T. E.

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Books

Air Power

Priya Satia
Wiley-Blackwell, 2016 January 1, 2016

Air power has proved crucial to the exercise of imperial power – conquest, disciplinary action, transportation, and surveillance – since the start of the 20th century. Initial experiments were made by the British in the Middle East for both cultural and practical reasons and were adapted in other places across time, up to American use of drones today.

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Commentary

Can the South Asian Academic Speak from Abroad? Colonialism and Anticolonialism in Modi’s America

Priya Satia
Perspectives on History, 2016 January 1, 2016

Following her signing of an open letter registering concerns about potential privacy abuses with Digital India and her op-ed "How to Think About Modi's Visit to Silicon Valley," Stanford historian Priya Satia addresses the hate mail and criticism those actions precipitated, ironically enough from defenders of India's Hindus' "particular tolerance."

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Commentary

On Gun Laws, We Must Get the History Right

Priya Satia
Slate, 2015 October 21, 2015

As restrictions on the right to carry guns in public are challenged in American courts, Stanford historian Priya Satia argues that a rigorous analysis of British history and law (as it is invoked by both sides) supports the right of governments to regulate gun ownership and use in the October 21, 2015 edition of Slate.

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Commentary

How to Think about Modi's Visit to Silicon Valley

Priya Satia
The Huffington Post, 2015 September 18, 2015

As Silicon Valley prepares to welcome Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Stanford historian Priya Satia argues that Indians and Americans should remember the state-abetted violence and intolerance of minorities in the recent past as enthusiasm for "Digital India" overwhelms concerns of religious and individual freedom in the September 18, 2015 edition of The Huffington Post.

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Commentary

Why We Need Persistent Questioning About Civilian Deaths by Drones

Priya Satia
The Huffington Post, 2015 April 30, 2015

After an American hostage was mistakenly killed in a CIA drone strike, Stanford historian Priya Satia argues that oversight of and attitudes toward the drone program should be examined in light of continuing civilian deaths in the AfPak region in the April 30, 2015 edition of The Huffington Post.

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