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Walter Scheidel
Books

The Oxford World History of Empire: Volume One: The Imperial Experience

Edited by Peter Fibiger Bang, C. A. Bayly, Walter Scheidel
2020 November 30, 2020
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Books

Escape from Rome: The Failure of Empire and the Road to Prosperity (The Princeton Economic History of the Western World)

Walter Scheidel
Princeton University Press , 2019 October 15, 2019

The fall of the Roman Empire has long been considered one of the greatest disasters in history. But in this groundbreaking book, Walter Scheidel argues that Rome’s dramatic collapse was actually the best thing that ever happened, clearing the path for Europe’s economic rise and the creation of the modern age.

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Journal Articles

Roman Wealth and Wealth Inequality in Comparative Perspective

Walter Scheidel
SSRN, 2019 October 2, 2019

Reflecting current concerns about economic inequality, scholars who study the pre-modern past are increasingly addressing this issue. The obstacles to measuring the distribution of income or wealth in the ancient Roman world are formidable. Only a few highly localized datasets are available. Any appraisal of conditions in the Roman empire as a whole therefore requires parametric modeling.

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Books

The Great Leveler: Violence and the History of Inequality from the Stone Age to the Twenty-First Century

Walter Scheidel
Princeton University Press, 2017 January 24, 2017

How only violence and catastrophes have consistently reduced inequality throughout world history

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Journal Articles

What is Ancient History?

Ian Morris, Walter Scheidel
Daedalus, 2016 April 8, 2016

Every society has told stories about ancient times, but contemporary ancient history was the product of two main developments. The first was the invention of writing, which made scholarly study of the past possible, and the second was the explosion of knowledge about the world from the eighteenth century onward. Europeans responded to this explosion by inventing two main versions of antiquity: the first, an evolutionary model, was global and went back to the origins of humanity; and the second, a classical model, treated Greece and Rome as turning points in world history.

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