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Journal Articles

Ottoman Early Modern

Ali Yaycioglu
Journal of the Ottoman and Turkish Studies Association, 2020 March 31, 2020

It would not be wrong to suggest that we have been undergoing a “global turn” in Ottoman studies for some time.

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Books

Rhythm: Form and Dispossession

Vincent Barletta
University of Chicago Press, 2020 March 31, 2020

More than the persistent beat of a song or the structural frame of poetry, rhythm is a deeply imbedded force that drives our world and is also a central component of the condition of human existence. It’s the pulse of the body, a power that orders matter, a strange and natural force that flows through us. Virginia Woolf describes it as a “wave in the mind” that carries us, something we can no more escape than we could stop our hearts from beating.

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Books

Terror and Tolerance: The Challenge of Inclusion of Muslims in Western Europe (Chapter in At the Forefront of Political Psychology Essays in Honor of John L. Sullivan)

Paul Sniderman, Rune Slothuus, Michael Bang Petersen, Rune Stubager, Robert Ford, Maria Sobolewska
2020 March 20, 2020

At the Forefront of Political Psychology pays tribute to John L. Sullivan, one of the most influential political psychologists of his generation. Sullivan’s scholarly contributions have deeply shaped our knowledge of belief systems and political tolerance, two flourishing research areas in political psychology that are crucial to understanding the turbulence of our times.

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Books

Roman Seas: A Maritime Archaeology of Eastern Mediterranean Economies

Justin Leidwanger
Oxford University Press, 2020 March 20, 2020

That seafaring was fundamental to Roman prosperity in the eastern Mediterranean is beyond doubt, but a tendency by scholars to focus on the grandest long-distance movements between major cities has obscured the finer and varied contours of maritime interaction. This book offers a nuanced archaeological analysis of maritime economy and connectivity in the Roman east.

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White Papers

Global Populisms and Their Challenges

Anna Grzymala-Busse, Didi Kuo, Francis Fukuyama, Michael A. McFaul
2020 March 11, 2020

“Populism” has claimed enormous amounts of popular and press attention, with the Brexit vote of 2016, the election of President Donald J. Trump, and the rise of self-proclaimed populists in Europe and elsewhere. But what exactly is populism? And is populism in Poland the same phenomenon as in the United States? Does populism have the same set of universal causes, or are there many paths to populist resurgence?

“Global Populisms and Their Challenges” finds that established mainstream political parties are the key enablers of populist challenges—and the key solution.

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Books

Borders and Freedom of Movement in the Holy Roman Empire

Luca Scholz
Oxford University Press, 2020 March 6, 2020

In the Holy Roman Empire 'no prince â can forbid men passage in the common road', wrote the English jurist John Selden. In practice, moving through one the most fractured landscapes in human history was rarely as straightforward as suggested by Selden's account of the German 'liberty of passage'.

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Working Papers

Were Jews in Interwar Poland More Educated?

Ran Abramitzky, Hanna Halaburda
NBER Working Paper, 2020 February 29, 2020

In the context of interwar Poland, we find that Jews tended to be more literate than non Jews, but show that this finding is driven by a composition effect. In particular, most Jews lived in cities and most non-Jews lived in rural areas, and people in cities were more educated than people in villages regardless of their religion. The case of interwar Poland illustrates that the Jewish relative education advantage depends on the historical and institutional contexts.

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Journal Articles

In Praise of Depth: or, How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Hidden

Joshua Landy
New Literary History, 2020 February 28, 2020

In recent years, some prominent scholars have been making a surprising claim: examining literary texts for hidden depths is overblown, misguided, or indeed downright dangerous. Such examination, they've warned us, may lead to the loss of world Heidegger warned of (Gumbrecht), to the world-denying metaphysics Nietzsche warned of (Nehamas), or to the suspicious form of hermeneutics Ricoeur warned of (Best, Marcus, Moi). This paper seeks to suggest that, though the concerns are understandable, there's ultimately nothing to worry about.

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Books

Thus Spoke Kubrick:“Guide Pieces,” Modes of Citation and the Rise of the Temp Track (Chapter in "After Kubrick: A Filmmaker’s Legacy")

Adrian Daub
Bloomsbury Collections, 2020 February 18, 2020

When it came to how movies sounded, Stanley Kubrick was of a particular moment, but he seized that moment in a unique way. The moment — one might designate it as 1968, though it extends beyond the calendar year — was one that Kubrick shared with other innovative young filmmakers who sought to renegotiate how films were scored. The end of the Golden Age studio system brought with it an end to one kind of smoothed-over Hollywood sound. And the rise of the Hollywood auteur presented new opportunities to incorporate unusual types of music in mainstream cinema.

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Working Papers

From Immigrants to Americans: Race and Assimilation During the Great Migration

Vicky Fouka, Soumyajit Mazumder, Marco Tabellini
SSRN, 2020 February 16, 2020

How does the appearance of a new immigrant group affect the integration of earlier generations of migrants? We study this question in the context of the first Great Migration (1915-1930), when 1.5 million African Americans moved from the US South to northern urban centers, where 30 million Europeans had arrived since 1850. We exploit plausibly exogenous variation induced by the interaction between 1900 settlements of southern-born blacks in northern cities and state-level out-migration from the US South after 1910.

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Journal Articles

Consequences of Authoritarian Party Exit and Reinvention for Democratic Competition

Anna Grzymala-Busse
Comparative Political Studies, 2020 February 16, 2020

How do the successors to authoritarian ruling parties influence subsequent democratic party competition? The existing literature does not distinguish among these parties, nor does it differentiate among the distinct strategies of their adaptation to the collapse of authoritarian rule. As a result, the impact of these parties on democracy has been unclear and difficult to discern.

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Books

Text Technologies: A History

Elaine Treharne, Claude Willan
Stanford University Press, 2020 February 11, 2020

The field of text technologies is a capacious analytical framework that focuses on all textual records throughout human history, from the earliest periods of traceable communication—perhaps as early as 60,000 BCE—to the present day. At its core, it examines the material history of communication: what constitutes a text, the purposes for which it is intended, how it functions, and the social ends that it serves.

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Journal Articles

What Determines Climate Policy Preferences if Reducing Greenhouse-Gas Emissions Is a Global Public Good?

Michael Bechtel, Kenneth F. Scheve, Elisabeth van Lieshout
SSRN, 2020 February 10, 2020

Many international policy problems, including climate change, have been characterized as global public goods. We adopt this theoretical framework to identify the baseline determinants of individual opinion about climate policy. The model implies that support for climate action will be increasing in future benefits, their timing, and the probability that a given country's contribution will make a difference while decreasing in expected costs.

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Journal Articles

Legitimacy in the ‘secular church’ of the United Nations

Jodok Troy
International Relations, 2020 February 4, 2020

This article argues that how the United Nations (UN) conceptualizes legitimacy is not only a matter of legalism or power politics. The UN’s conception of legitimacy also utilizes concepts, language and symbolism from the religious realm. Understanding the entanglement between political and religious concepts and the ways of their verbalization at the agential level sheds light on how legitimacy became to be acknowledged as an integral part of the UN and how it changes.

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Journal Articles

“Nash-in-Nash” tariff bargaining

Kyle Bagwell, Robert W. Staiger, Ali Yurukoglu
Journal of International Economics, 2020 January 31, 2020

We provide an equilibrium analysis of the efficiency properties of simultaneous bilateral tariff negotiations in a three-country model of international trade. We consider the setting in which discriminatory tariffs are allowed, and we utilize the “Nash-in-Nash” solution concept of Horn and Wolinsky (1988). We allow for a general family of political-economic country welfare functions and assess efficiency relative to these welfare functions.

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Journal Articles

Archaeology and contemporary emerging zoonosis: A framework for predicting future Rift Valley fever virus outbreaks

Krish Seetah, Desiree LaBeaud, Jochen Kumm, Elysse Grossi‐Soyster, Alfred Anangwe, Michele Barry
International Journal of Osteoarchaeology, 2020 January 29, 2020

Modelling of emerging vector borne diseases serves as an important complement to clinical studies of modern zoonoses. This article presents an archaeo‐historic epidemiological modelling study of Rift Valley fever (RVF), using data‐driven neural network technology. RVF affects both human and animal populations, can rapidly decimate herds causing catastrophic economic hardship, and is identified as a Category A biodefense pathogen by the US Center for Disease Control.

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Books

Expanding the Agnotological Toolbox: Methods of Sex and Gender Analysis (Chapter in Science and the Production of Ignorance: When the Quest for Knowledge Is Thwarted)

Londa Schiebinger
MIT Press, 2020 January 24, 2020

An introduction to the new area of ignorance studies that examines how science produces ignorance—both actively and passively, intentionally and unintentionally.

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Journal Articles

The effect of citizenship on the long-term earnings of marginalized immigrants: Quasi-experimental evidence from Switzerland

Jens Hainmueller, Dominik Hangartner, Dalston Ward
Science Advances, 2019 December 31, 2019

We provide evidence that citizenship catalyzes the long-term economic integration of immigrants. Despite the relevance of citizenship policy to immigrant integration, we lack a reliable understanding of the economic consequences of acquiring citizenship. To overcome nonrandom selection into naturalization, we exploit the quasi-random assignment of citizenship in Swiss municipalities that held referendums to decide the outcome of individual naturalization applications.

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Journal Articles

Heidegger Never Got Beyond Facticity

Thomas Sheehan
Journal of Philosophical Investigations, 2019 December 31, 2019

(1) The “thing itself” of Heidegger’s thinking was Ereignis. (2) But Ereignis is a reinscription of what Being and Time had called thrownness or facticity. (3) But facticity/Ereignis is ex-sistence’s ever-operative appropriation to its proper structure as the ontological “space” or “clearing” that makes possible practical and theoretical discursivity. (4) Such facticity is the ultimate and inevitable presupposition of all activities of ex-sistence and thus of any understanding of being.

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Books

The Lusiads Affect: Standing in the Middle of the Sea (Chapter in A Companion to World Literature: 1451 to 1770 The Emergence of Modernity)

Vincent Barletta
Wiley-Blackwell, 2019 December 19, 2019

In this chapter I begin by discussing the impact that Luís Vaz de Camões's epic masterwork, The Lusiads (Os Lusíadas, 1572), has had on the long epic tradition in Portugal and Brazil. After this, I present a brief account of the text's many translations and its subsequent entry into the broader stream of “world literature.” I then examine key approaches to the text, beginning with Manuel de Faria e Sousa's 1639 commentary, a study that has in many senses not been surpassed.

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Books

Dialect Jokebooks and Russian-Yiddish and English-Yiddish Dictionaries (Chapter in The Whole World in a Book: Dictionaries in the Nineteenth Century)

Gabriella Safran
Oxford University Press, 2019 December 13, 2019

Edited by Sarah Ogilvie and Gabriella Safran

  • Advances new arguments and theories about the development of lexicography and how changes in the nineteenth century resonate today
  • Covers a wide range of languages, and represents the first time some of these dictionaries have been addressed by academic scholarship
  • Draws on unpublished and archival material not previously analyzed in the literature
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Books

Poetic Thinking Today

Amir Eshel
Stanford University Press, 2019 November 30, 2019

Thinking is much broader than what our science-obsessed, utilitarian culture often takes it to be. More than mere problem solving or the methodical comprehension of our personal and natural circumstances, thinking may take the form of a poem, a painting, a sculpture, a museum exhibition, or a documentary film. Exploring a variety of works by contemporary artists and writers who exemplify poetic thinking, this book draws our attention to one of the crucial affordances of this form of creative human insight and wisdom: its capacity to help protect and cultivate human freedom.

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Journal Articles

Public Health Insurance Expansion for Immigrant Children and Interstate Migration of Low-Income Immigrants

Vasil I Yasenov, Duncan Lawrence, Fernando S Mendoza, Jens Hainmueller
JAMA Pediatric, 2019 November 30, 2019

Federal policy changes in 2002 and 2009 led some states to expand public health insurance coverage to non-US-born children and pregnant women who are lawful permanent residents during their first 5 years of residency in the United States. In other states, there were concerns that insurance expansion could attract immigrants to relocate to gain free health insurance coverage.

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