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NATO commander calls for recalibration in Europe

News / November 9, 2015

 

NATO must bolster its presence in Europe as a way to counter Russian aggression in the region.

That was the message from General PHILIP M. BREEDLOVE, the supreme allied commander of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), when he visited Stanford on Monday.

“Europe is clearly at a crossroads,” he said.

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Stanford's new European Security Initiative focuses on changing geopolitical landscape

News / October 28, 2015

First, it was the 2014 annexation of Crimea. Then, it was the intervention in eastern Ukraine. Most recently, airstrikes and naval cruise missiles are hitting targets in Syria.

What, many are wondering, is Russian President Vladimir Putin up to?

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McFaul Explains the Myth of Putin's Strategic Genius

Commentary / October 23, 2015

In an opinion piece published on October 23, 2015 in the New York Time, FSI director and senior fellow Michael McFaul shares his latest comentary on Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Read Professor McFaul's Op Ed in the New York Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/23/opinion/the-myth-of-putins-strategic-g....

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New study links immigrant naturalization to long-term political integration

News / September 29, 2015

One of the key policy debates in Europe centers on how best to integrate immigrants. The issue is particularly salient in Switzerland where immigrants make up almost 25% of the population. New research from scholars at Stanford and the University of Zurich demonstrates that naturalization substantially improves the political integration of immigrants.

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The Europe Center September 2015 Newsletter

News / September 23, 2015
The Europe Center September 2015 Newsletter
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Migration crisis divides European policymakers

News / August 28, 2015

The recent discovery of at least 50 dead migrants aboard a boat off the shores of Libya sparked a discussion on KQED Radio’s “forum with Michael Krasny" about the escalating crisis (Thurs., Aug. 27, 2015). Cécile Alduy, Stanford associate professor of French literature and affiliated faculty at The Europe Center was one of those asked to weigh in on Europe’s migration policy struggle.

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The Europe Center May 2015 Newsletter

News / May 14, 2015
The Europe Center May 2015 Newsletter
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French ambassador talks terrorism, climate change

News / May 1, 2015

France is grappling with rising terrorism and the climate change problem, French Ambassador Gérard Araud said during a talk sponsored by The Europe Center.

"We had been expecting a terrorist attack for some time," said Araud, referencing the January massacre in Paris in which two shooters who identified themselves as Islamic terrorists killed 12 people at the Charlie Hebdo newspaper offices and wounded several others. "The attack in Paris was like our 9/11."

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Stanford scholar unpacks the rhetoric behind extremist politician's mainstream success

News / April 17, 2015

French politician Marine Le Pen carried her father's right-wing fringe political party to first place in the country's latest elections for European Parliament.

Stanford scholar Cécile Alduy says Le Pen's success at the helm of France's right-wing National Front can be attributed to a combination of sophisticated rebranding and skillfully crafted moderate rhetoric that sells a conservative agenda that borders on extreme.

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At Stanford, key diplomat describes changing face of NATO

Commentary / April 9, 2015

NATO is reassessing its fundamental relationship with Russia and focusing on new threats not imagined at its inception in the wake of World War II, a key U.S. diplomat told Stanford students and faculty.

Douglas Lute, America’s ambassador to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, said Washington and Moscow found a way to collaborate since the collapse of the Soviet Union. But that has changed under President Vladimir Putin, he said.

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The Europe Center April 2015 Newsletter

News / April 1, 2015
The Europe Center April 2015 Newsletter
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FSI’s McFaul on the death of Boris Nemtsov

Commentary / March 2, 2015

 

As the world reacts to the death of Boris Nemtsov, FSI Director Michael McFaul adds his thoughts and commentary on the slaying of the Russian opposition leader. McFaul, who served as Washington’s ambassador to Moscow, knew Nemtsov well and called him a “real patriot who believed in the possibility of Russia’s greatness.”

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The Europe Center February 2015 Newsletter

News / February 6, 2015
The Europe Center February 2015 Newsletter
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FSI scholars on Paris terror attack

Q&A / January 8, 2015

The terrorist shootings in Paris have brought a new round of attention to issues of immigration, political polarization, religious discrimination and threats to global security. Scholars at Stanford’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies are following the developments and talking about the attacks.

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Stanford scholar reveals the surprising cultural history of four-hand piano playing

News / December 9, 2014

In 19th-century Europe – long before LPs, CDs or mp3s – there were only two ways to listen to, say, the latest Beethoven symphony: either you were lucky enough to hear it performed at the local concert hall, or you played it at home yourself.

Not with a full orchestra, of course, but in a piano transcription, an arrangement that compressed symphonic violins, oboes and tubas onto a single keyboard score. And, to really mimic the range of a whole orchestra, amateurs played "four-handed," with two pianists sitting side-by-side.

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Former ambassador, political scientist McFaul to lead FSI

News / November 5, 2014

Michael McFaul, a Stanford political scientist and former U.S. ambassador to Russia, has been selected as the next director of the university’s Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies.

The announcement was made Wednesday by Stanford Provost John Etchemendy and Ann Arvin, the university’s vice provost and dean of research. McFaul will succeed Mariano-Florentino Cuéllar, who was nominated in July as an associate justice of the California Supreme Court and elected Tuesday.

McFaul takes the helm of FSI in January.

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A tight race for the Scottish independence vote

News / September 15, 2014

Scottish voters go to the polls this Thursday to determine whether to remain part of the United Kingdom, or to become an independent Scotland.  The latest polls show a neck and neck race, a development that would not have been believable just months ago when the "No" campaign held a dominant lead.

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European immigrants to America in early 20th century assimilated successfully, Stanford economist says

News / August 7, 2014

European immigrants to America during the country's largest migration wave in the late 19th and early 20th centuries had earnings comparable to native-born Americans, contrary to the popular perception, according to new Stanford research.

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Stanford scholar views France's nationalistic politics with a historical eye

News / July 1, 2014

Marine Le Pen and the French political party she leads, the National Front, are the topics of a book being written by Stanford Associate Professor Cécile Alduy.
Photo Credit: Jacques Brinon/AP

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